Black SplatThe Full Monty (1997)
   

"He's fat, you're thin, and you're both fucking ugly.”

The Full Monty - Members of HARD STEEL practice a dance routine

Description: Gerald Arthur Gooper (Tim Wilkenson) offers his critique to a bunch of wannabe male striptease performers in the motion picture The Full Monty (1997).

"They invested their lives, on a town that was on its way out. They were about to lose everything they worked for, everything they loved. Now, these six, unemployed factory workers are training for it, planning for it, and going all the way. Fox Searchlight pictures presents, a comedy about staying alive, working together, and uncovering your potential." - Movie Trailer

When harsh economic times hit the once prosperous English town of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, Gary "Gaz" Schofield, an unemployed steel worker looks for a way to survive, as well as find funds to pay his child support. Then one day, Gaz comes upon a group of Chippendale dancers who are wowing women at a local club and conceives a plan to form his own crew of male strippers, which he calls "Hard Steel".

"Dancers have coordination, skill, timing, fitness, and grace. Take a long, hard look in the mirror." - Gerald Cooper

Recruiting the help of Gerald Arthur Cooper, the former plant manager at Harrison Steel Mill who is knowledgeable in the basics of ballroom dance, Gaz and his friend Dave Horsefall interview potential candidates at an open-audition for their male exotic dancing act. The final members of the Hard Steel consist of:

  • Gary "Gaz" Schofield (Robert Carlyle), divorced father who wants to see his son.
  • Dave Horsefall (Mark Addy), chubby married guy who feels his wife no longer loves him.
  • Lomper (Steve Huison), a laid-off steel mill security guard (whose suicidal).
  • Horse (Paul Barber), an older black guy who knows how to dance (70s disco style).
  • Guy (Hugo Speer), who is not much of a dancer, but he is very, well endowed
  • Gerald Arthur Cooper, the group's choreographer, who joins the boys on stage at the last moment.

Dave: What if next Friday 400 women turn 'round and say "He's too fat, he's too old and he's a pigeon-chested little tosser?" What happens then, eh?
Horse: They wouldn't say that, would they?
Dave: Why not? He's just said her tits are too big.
Lomper: That's different. We're... blokes.
Dave: Yeah, and?
Gerald: I think she's got nice tits, actually.
Lomper: I never said owt about her personality, like. I mean, she's probably quite nice if you get to know her.
Dave: No. And they won't say nowt about your personality neither. Which is good 'cause you're basically a bastard. Bollocks to your personality - this is what they're looking at, right? And I'll tell you summat, mate. Anti-wrinkle cream there may be, but anti-fat-bastard cream there is none.

The Full Monty - It's SHOWtime

To test out their act, the group invite several female relatives to attend a rehearsal at an abandoned factory. Unfortunately, the boys are, so to speak, caught with their pants down and arrested by a security guard but released when no charges are filed against their trespassing. However, when the newspapers get hold of the story, the boys soon realize that their strip extravaganza advertised as “Hot Metal" is now sold out and so they decide the show must go on.

The night of the performance, the audience is filled with not only women, but men, which at first makes Gaz reluctant to perform, but when he realizes that his estranged ex-wife, Mandy (Emily Woof) and his little boy, Nathan (William Snape) have come to the show, he gathers his courage and goes out to perform...a performance that promised to show the "Full Monty" (removing all their clothes).

As "Hard Steel" hit the stage, they strip to a recording of "You Can Leave Your Hat On" sung by Tom Jones. At the climax of their performance, the boys' private parts - now covered only by their hats - are revealed...and the crowd goes wild.


The Full Monty - Movie Poster


 
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